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Too and To (The Difference)

The Quick Answer
What is the difference between too and to?

Too

(1) Too means as well. For example:
  • Your eye is swollen. Your lip is swollen too.
(2) Too conveys the idea of in excess. For example:
  • Your cat is too fat.

To

(1) To is a preposition. For example:
  • Give it to him.
(2) To shows the infinitive form of a verb. For example:
  • I want to run.

Too and To

There is often confusion over the words too and to. Both words have two uses. This infographic summarizes the different uses of to and too:

Too

Too has two uses:

(1) Too means as well or also.
  • I can do it too.
  • Did you think that too?
Read more about too meaning as well or also.

(2) Too portrays the idea of in excess or more than it should be.
  • This cat is too chubby.
  • The shoes were too expensive.
  • I'm glad to hear you smoke. A man should always have an occupation of some kind. There are far too many idle men in London as it is. (Oscar Wilde)
Read more about too meaning in excess.

To

To has two uses:

(1) To is used in expressions like to walk, to run, to paint, etc. (These are all verbs in their infinitive forms.)
  • I want to run around the planet.
  • Did you tell her what to think?
  • I'm glad to hear you smoke. A man should always have an occupation of some kind. There are far too many idle men in London as it is. (Oscar Wilde)
Read more about to show the infinitive form.

(2) To is used in expressions like to the park, to the postman, and agree to a proposal. (The word to in these examples is a preposition.)
  • She handed the parcel to the stranger.
  • I am going to the park.
Read more about to used as a preposition.
Interactive Test
 
 
Note

What Is a Preposition?

The word to is a preposition. Prepositions show the relationship between at least two words in a sentence.
  • He agreed to the proposal.
    (To shows the relationship between agreed and proposal.)
  • David ran to the park.
  • (To shows the relationship between ran and park.)
Words like on, in, and by are also prepositions. There are lots of others.

Read more about prepositions.

What Is the Infinitive Form?

Verbs are doing words (e.g., to dance, to sit, to fly, to think).

When to is in front of a verb, the verb is said to be in its infinitive form.
  • She likes to dance.
  • (This is the verb to dance in its infinitive form.)
  • She dances.
  • (This is the verb to dance not in its infinitive form.)
Read more about verbs.